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Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939) continued as Marvel Mystery Comics # 2-92 (Dec. 1939 - June 1949).

Marvel Mystery Comics #30In 1939, pulp-magazine publisher Martin Goodman expanded into the newly emerging comic book field by buying content from comics package Funnies, Inc. His first effort, Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939), from his company Timely Publications, featured the first appearances of writer-artist Carl Burgos' android superhero, the Human Torch, and Paul Gustavson's costumed detective the Angel. As well, it contained the first generally available appearance of Bill Everett's mutant anti-hero Namor the Sub-Mariner, created for the unpublished movie-theater giveaway comic, Motion Picture Funnies Weekly earlier that year, with the eight-page original story now expanded by four pages.

Also included was Al Anders' Western hero the Masked Raider; the jungle lord Ka-Zar the Great, with Ben Thompson adapting over the first five issues the story "King of Fang and Claw" by Bob Byrd in Goodman's eponymous pulp magazine Ka-Zar #1 (Oct. 1936); the non-continuing-character story "Jungle Terror," featuring an adventurer named Ken Masters, written by the quirkily named Tohm Dixon; "Now I'll Tell One", five single-panel, black-and-white gag cartoons by Fred Schwab, on the inside front cover; and a two-page prose story by Ray Gill, "Burning Rubber", about auto racing. A painted cover by veteran science fiction pulp artist Frank R. Paul featured the Human Torch, looking much different than in the interior story.

That initial comic, cover-dated October 1939, quickly sold out 80,000 copies, prompting Goodman to produce a second printing, cover-dated November 1939 and identical except for a black bar in the inside-front-cover indicia over the October date, and the November date added at the end. That sold approximately 800,000 copies. With a hit on his hands, Goodman began assembling an in-house staff, hiring Funnies, Inc. writer-artist Joe Simon as editor. Simon brought along his collaborator, artist Jack Kirby, followed by artist Syd Shores.Marvel Mystery Comics #13

Marvel Comics was rechristened Marvel Mystery Comics with issue #2 (Dec. 1939). The Torch and the Sub-Mariner would continue to star in the long-running title even after receiving their own solo comic-book series shortly afterward. The Angel, who was featured on the covers of issues #2-3, would appear in every issue through #79 (Dec. 1946).

Other characters introduced in the title include the aviator the American Ace (#2, Dec. 1939), with part one of his origin reprinted, like the first part of the Sub-Mariner's, from Motion Picture Funnies Weekly #1; the Ferret; and writer-artist Steve Dahlman's robot hero Electro (appearing in every issue from #4-19, Feb. 1940 - May 1941). Issue #13 saw the first appearance of the Vision, the inspiration for the same-name Marvel Comics superhero created in 1968. The original Vision appeared in solo stories through Marvel Mystery Comics #48.

In 1949, with the popularity of superheroes having waned, the book was converted into the horror anthology Marvel Tales from issue #93-159 (Aug. 1949 - Aug. 1957), when it ceased publication.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Bob Oksner (October 14, 1916, New York City - February 18, 2007) was an American comics artist known for both adventure comic strips and for superhero and humor comic books, primarily at DC Comics.Bob Oksner

Born Oct. 14, 1916 in New York City he and his family migrated to Paterson, N. J. Bob always had a casual interest in art and while preparing for a legal career at N.Y.U., he edited the N.Y.U. Humor Magazine and met many well-known artists. It was their encouragement that led him to study at the Art Student's League.

After completion of his course, Bob went back to Columbia University for an M.A. Degree. He then taught art and history in high school until opportunity knocked in the form of an editorship for a comic magazine publisher.

Oksner's early work includes The Destroyer and creating the second version of Marvel Boy in 1943 for Timely Comics, the 1930s-'40s predecessor of Marvel Comics. He went on to write and draw the comic strip Miss Cairo Jones (1945–1947) for Bell Syndicate, and later went on to draw the newspaper comic-strip spin-off of the 1950s TV sitcom I Love Lucy for King Features Syndicate. Both strips enjoyed very successful runs.

After which DC editor Sheldon Mayer hired him as an artist on comics adapted from other media. Being a specialist in the field of cartooning personalities, it was only natural that Bob should do comic magazine treatments of Sgt. Bilko, Jerry Lewis and Dobie Gillis. There, he moved from adventure strips to teen-oriented strips. Oksner's work in this field included Adventures of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis and its successor, Adventures of Jerry Lewis; Adventures of Bob Hope; The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis; Sgt. Bilko; Pat Boone; and Welcome Back, Kotter. Other work includes drawing the original humor comics Angel and the Ape and Stanley and His Monster.Marvel Mystery Comics #16

Being one of the most talented and prolific artists in the field, Bob can handle any assignment from straight illustration to comic cartooning equally well. It is this great talent that has won for him not only the plaudits of those he works with, but the much coveted “Best Cartoonist Award" from the National Society of Cartoonists for two successive years.

When the demand for that type of humor comics fell off by the 1970s, Oksner began drawing such DC superhero series as Superman Supergirl, Wonder Woman, Shazam!, Black Orchid, Lois Lane, Ambush Bug, and others.

Oksner's other work in comic strips included succeeding Gus Edson as writer of artist-creator Irwin Hasen's Dondi for a time beginning in 1965; and drawing and co-creating Soozi (1967), with Don Weldon. He retired from comics in 1986.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and Adventures of Jerry Lewis #73 (November-December 1962)