• Tales to Astonish 1  Tales to Astonish 2 Tales to Astonish 3 Tales to Astonish 4 Tales to Astonish 5

    Tales to Astonish 6 Tales to Astonish 7 Tales to Astonish 8 Tales to Astonish 9 Tales to Astonish 10

    Tales to Astonish 11 Tales to Astonish 12 Tales to Astonish 13 Tales to Astonish 14 Tales to Astonish 15

    Tales to Astonish 16 Tales to Astonish 17 Tales to Astonish 18 Tales to Astonish 19 Tales to Astonish 20

    Tales to Astonish 21 Tales to Astonish 22 Tales to Astonish 23 Tales to Astonish 24 Tales to Astonish 25

    Tales to Astonish 26 Tales to Astonish 27 Tales to Astonish 28 Tales to Astonish 29 Tales to Astonish 30

    Tales to Astonish 31 Tales to Astonish 32 Tales to Astonish 33 Tales to Astonish 34 Tales to Astonish 35

    Tales to Astonish 36 Tales to Astonish 37 Tales to Astonish 38 Tales to Astonish 39 Tales to Astonish 40

    Tales to Astonish 41 Tales to Astonish 42 Tales to Astonish 43 Tales to Astonish 44 Tales to Astonish 45

    Tales to Astonish 46 Tales to Astonish 47 Tales to Astonish 48 Tales to Astonish 49 Tales to Astonish 50

    Tales to Astonish 51 Tales to Astonish 52 Tales to Astonish 53 Tales to Astonish 54

     

Click on each image to view larger
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
10 11 12
13 14 15
16 17 18
19 20 21
22 23 24
25 26 27
28 29 30
31 32 33
34 35 36
37 38 39
40 41 42
43 44 45
46 47 48
49 50 51
52 53 54



Free web hostingWeb hosting

Tales to Astonish #1-54 (January 1959 - April 1964; #35-54 Horror + Ant Man; #55-101 only Superheroes).

Tales to Astonish is the name of two American comic book series and a one-shot comic published by Marvel Comics.Tales to Astonish 9

The primary title bearing that name was published from 1959-1968. It began as a science-fiction anthology that served as a showcase for such artists as Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, then featured superheroes during the period fans and historians call the Silver Age of Comic Books. It became The Incredible Hulk with issue #102 (April 1968).

A second Marvel comic bearing the name, reprinting stories of the undersea ruler the Sub-Mariner, ran 14 issues from 1979-1981. A superhero one-shot followed in 1994.

The early run of Tales to Astonish, from issues #1-34 (Jan. 1959 - Aug 1962), began under Atlas Comics, the 1950s forerunner of Marvel, before eventually falling under the Marvel banner. It contained science-fiction mystery/suspense stories written primarily by editor-in-chief Stan Lee, with artists including Kirby, Ditko, Dick Ayers, Don Heck and Paul Reinman. One such story, "The Man In The Ant Hill", in #27 (Jan. 1962), introduced the character Henry Pym, who would be repurposed eight issues later as the superhero Ant-Man. Anthological stories continued to appear as backups until Tales to Astonish became a superhero "split book" in 1964, when it began featuring one story each of Giant-Man and the Hulk.Tales to Astonish 27

Following his one-shot anthological story in #27, scientist Henry Pym returned donning a cybernetic helmet and red costume, and using size-changing technology to debut as the insect-sized hero Ant-Man in #35 (Sept. 1962). The series was plotted by Lee and scripted by his brother, Larry Lieber, with penciling first by Jack Kirby and later by Don Heck and others. The first half of the book would be dedicated to Ant-Man (And later on, Giant-Man) stories, while the second half would be more science fiction stories.

Ant-Man fought a series of such undistinguished antagonists as the Protector, the Porcupine, Comrade X, Egghead, and the Scarlet Beetle (an actual, mutated scarlet beetle). Ant-Man teamed up with socialite-turned-heroine, Janet Van Dyne, the Wasp, in #44 (June 1963), under former Atlas staffer Ernie Hart, writing under a pseudonym.

Ant-Man began size-shifting in the opposite direction in #49 (Nov. 1963), when he added two letters to his name to become Giant-Man.

Lee remained as writer through the end of the feature's run, except for two stories scripted by Leon Lazarus (#64, Feb. 1965) and Al Hartley (#69, the finale, July 1965). Artists of the latter part of the run included Ditko, Ayers, and two greats of the period fans and historians call the Golden Age of comic books, Carl Burgos and Bob Powell.Tales to Astonish 22

The backup feature "Tales of the Wasp" (#51-56) used the superheroine as a framing device for anthological science-fiction stories, having her relate tales to hospitalized servicemen and the like. The Wasp also starred in two subsequent solo backup stories. All were scripted and penciled by Lieber.


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Tales to Astonish 31